20090616

more paperbax





3 kommentarer:

troylloyd sa...

a couple more paperbax, i dunno what to call this, maybe a conceptual bookwork or something, but it has as its forebear the playful things Dieter Roth used to do with Icelandic newspapers.

a sequential order of pages from misc. diverse paperback books compose a whole & somehow cohere, i am not the books author, it's an operation in literal cutting & pasting, it's creatively uncreative in that my only role is to compose by choice of specific pages...

satu kaikkonen sa...

Your paperbaxes
are

they just are...

"my only role is to compose..."


=)

troylloyd sa...

i recently came across this, which is quite interesting:

Tolkien's real indebtedness to Finnish, however, becomes apparent when we look at the grammar with which he endowed his high Elvish language. Like Finnish, Quenya is rich in suffixes that alter the meaning of the noun or verb to which they are attached. Many Quenya suffixes are drawn directly from Finnish. Finnish is also an agglutinative language, which means that it may add multiple suffixes to its words to further augment or refine their meanings. Noun suffixes can be used to convey location, number (singular or plural), and even ownership. Thus, for instance, the Finnish word kirjoissani is made up of the following parts: kirja (the noun "book"), -i- (a plural marker), -ssa (a case ending meaning "in"), and -ni (a possessive marker meaning "my"). Together, these syllables express the same meaning as the English phrase "in my books." Tolkien's Quenya follows its source closely, although it requires that the suffixes be added in a different order. Thus the Quenya parmanyassen can be broken down into the components parma ("book"),nya- ("my"), -sse- ("in"), and -n (plural marker).